Designing the experience of Elite: Dangerous

In this interview, Louise McLennan – Senior UX Designer at Frontier Developments – discuss the design challenges of a video game such as Elite: Dangerous.

About the game – Frontier Developments released Elite: Dangerous in December 2014, after a successful Kickstarter campaign. For this game, they further developed the concepts of trading and combat that were part of the original version of Elite, which Acornsoft released in 1984. However, Elite: Dangerous offers both a massively multiplayer, persistent world of online play, as well as single-player gaming. The game’s user experience evolves many of the same designs and concepts that the original game introduced, and many of its current players are part of the older demographic who played the original game.

Read the interview on UXMatters.

Invision blog: A brief history of user experience

Invision blog: A brief history of user experience

In this article published on Invision blogALI RUSHDAN TARIQ tells the (quick) story of user experience:

Think about the last time you ate at a restaurant. What cuisine did it serve? What made you to choose that particular restaurant? What was your first impression as you walked in? Were you asked to wait till you were ushered to an available seat? How was the menu arranged? Did food come quickly enough? How did it taste? How was the customer service? Did your squaring up go smoothly? Would you go back again? Your answers to these questions, including all the emotional highs and lows, encompass the restaurant’s user experience (UX).

However, when people use the term UX, they’re usually referring to one’s experience with a digital or technological product or service. The implication is that the user’s experience has been designed and is, at least potentially, further designable. Today, UX has grown into an important design discipline that continues to grow and evolve. And while it’s fairly new, its multidisciplinary history can be traced all the way back to the Renaissance—if not earlier. To think about where the much debated-practice of user experience design will take us next, it’ll help to take a look back at some of the key events in its meandering evolution.

Read the full article.

Top UX trends in 2015? Here’s your list.

Top UX trends in 2015? Here’s your list.

After publishing a collection of the top UX trends of the 2014, UX Magazine has collected a list of the top UX trends of the 2015 – according to some prominent professionals. Just to give you a preview:

  • A Rise in “Slippy” UX – Shannon Copfer, JW Player
  • The Death of Web Design – Sergio Nouvel of Continuum
  • The Race from Good to Great Customer Experience Intensifies – Harley Manning, Forrester
  • Deeper Integration of Digital and Physical Experiences – Anders Arnquist, Veryday
  • House of Cards – Will Hacker
  • More Celebrity-Driven Apps – Josh Tyson, UX Magazine
  • The Ascent of User Experience as a Business Strategy – Scott Plewes, Macadamian
  • More Targeted and Tailored Experiences for Different Device Types – Doug Hopkins, Isobar
  • Embracing the Materials of Design – Steven Hoober
  • Prepare for a World of Automation – Rebekah Rousi
  • Online Learning Comes Into its Own – John McGloon
  • Security and Privacy – Mary Brodie

Read the full article.

Adaptation is designers’ most important skill

Josh Payton: “I’m often faced with two types of job applicants. One has years of experience, an impressive portfolio of work and a specialty that took years to hone. That candidate discusses their job history engagingly, within the parameters of what is known and what has come before. The other candidate is young—sometimes almost ridiculously so—and is only held back by a lack of experience. That candidate never talks about history, but about what she wants to learn, where she thinks the world is going, and what kinds of products she wants to develop there. The second candidate is the smarter hire.” Read the full story here.