Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis

Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis

Cathie Marache-Francisco, Éric Brangier, “ Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis ”, Le travail humain 2/2015 (Vol. 78) , p. 165-189. From the abstract:

Gamification deals with new human-machine interaction design practices. It consists of elements which are inspired from videogames, with the hope that this relationship which is designed to be more hedonic, engaging and motivating, will lead to positive changes within human-machine interactions, especially when applied to work practices and productivity matters. In this article, we present a synthesis of that notion, paralleled with ergonomics, concerning its definition and its design.

We first draw a definition from the gamification literature. It can be considered as the use of game elements in generally digital non-gaming systems which are adapted to the users’ profiles in order to generate motivation and engagement, with a focus on pleasurable experiences, even fun ones. We also mention the context of emergence of gamification. We then define and illustrate gamification design.

Afterwards, this paper highlights critical factors which could help the ergonomist to participate in the design of efficient and satisfactory gamified systems. We then broaden this discussion to analyze the core meaning of gamification at work: the promise of flourishing and engagement through innovative interactions, as well as the production of competitive knowledge.

Download the full paper (in French).


Raluca Budiu on Apple Watch user-experience

Raluca Budiu on Apple Watch user-experience

Raluca Badiu – Senior Researcher with Nielsen Norman Group – has just published an article with some observations on the user-experience of the Apple Watch. Focusing on some very specific characteristic such as UI targets, gestures with no affordances or signifiers, card navigation, handoff, content, and essential information,  she notices:

[…]

In spite of the unbridled enthusiasm that the Apple watch has generated on many tech sites, unfortunately, its UI didn’t get us much closer to the future

[…]

smartwatch apps should rely on gestures more than on navigation elements, prioritize the essential, support handoff, and create tailored, standalone content.”

Read the article.

Invision blog: A brief history of user experience

Invision blog: A brief history of user experience

In this article published on Invision blogALI RUSHDAN TARIQ tells the (quick) story of user experience:

Think about the last time you ate at a restaurant. What cuisine did it serve? What made you to choose that particular restaurant? What was your first impression as you walked in? Were you asked to wait till you were ushered to an available seat? How was the menu arranged? Did food come quickly enough? How did it taste? How was the customer service? Did your squaring up go smoothly? Would you go back again? Your answers to these questions, including all the emotional highs and lows, encompass the restaurant’s user experience (UX).

However, when people use the term UX, they’re usually referring to one’s experience with a digital or technological product or service. The implication is that the user’s experience has been designed and is, at least potentially, further designable. Today, UX has grown into an important design discipline that continues to grow and evolve. And while it’s fairly new, its multidisciplinary history can be traced all the way back to the Renaissance—if not earlier. To think about where the much debated-practice of user experience design will take us next, it’ll help to take a look back at some of the key events in its meandering evolution.

Read the full article.

[Paper] Using Design Competitions in Crowdsourcing UI/UX Design: An Experimental Grounded Theory Study

[Paper] Using Design Competitions in Crowdsourcing UI/UX Design: An Experimental Grounded Theory Study

In this study, Micky Chen (University of Amsterdam) presents an experimental study in form of a contest to analyze how design competitions might be used in crowdsourcing user interface design. From the abstract:

Crowdsourcing has gained great popularity over the past decade. Using the power of the crowd might be a useful source for next-generation software designing. However, little is known about whether the quality of one’s design can improve by using parts of other designs. To address this gap, I conducted a grounded theory study to analyze the role of crowdsourcing in creating user interface designs. An experimental study was conducted in the form of a contest to analyze how design competitions might be used in crowdsourcing user interface design. In the two-round contest, participants created a UI, which was subsequently distributed to the other participants, so each has access to all first round designs. The second round required a revised UI design, with participants being encouraged to borrow each other’s ideas in creating a revised design when they saw a fit. The results show that on average, participants’ designs improved and everyone used at least one idea from another person. This indicates that recombination and crowdsourcing leads to high(er) quality user interfaces. However, due to the limitations of the experiment setup, more research is needed into how to set up UX design contests so as to maximize the benefits of crowdsourcing.

Read the full paper.