Texting while walking: adapting to accommodate technological changes

Texting while walking: adapting to accommodate technological changes

From the abstract: “Mobile phone texting is a common daily occurrence with a paucity of research examining corresponding gait characteristics. To date, most studies have participants walk in a straight line vs. overcoming barriers and obstacles that occur during regular walking. The aim of our study is to examine the effect of mobile phone texting during periods of cognitive distraction while walking and negotiating barriers synonymous with pedestrian traffic.

Thirty participants (18-50y) completed three randomized, counter-balanced walking tasks over a course during: (1) normal walking (control), (2) texting and walking, and (3) texting and walking whilst being cognitively distraction via a standard mathematical test performed while negotiating the obstacle course. We analyzed gait characteristics during course negotiation using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system and a general linear model and Dunnet-Hsu post-hoc procedure the normal walking condition to assess gait characteristic differences. Primary outcomes included the overall time to complete the course time and barrier contact. Secondary outcomes included obstacle clearance height, step frequency, step time, double support phase and lateral deviation.

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Benevolent Deception in Human Computer Interaction

Benevolent Deception in Human Computer Interaction

From the abstract: “Though it has been asserted that “good design is honest,” deception exists throughout human-computer interaction research and practice. Because of the stigma associated with deception—in many cases rightfully so—the research community has focused its energy on eradicating malicious deception, and ignored instances in which deception is positively employed. In this paper, we present the notion of benevolent deception, deception aimed at benefitting the user as well as the developer. We frame our discussion using a criminology-inspired model and ground components in various examples. We assert that this provides us with a set of tools and principles that not only helps us with system and interface design, but that opens new research areas. After all, as Cockton claims in his 2004 paper “Value-Centered HCI”, “Traditional disciplines have delivered truth. The goal of HCI is to deliver value.”

Read the full paper.

See the slides.

Eytan Adar, Desney Tan, and Jaime Teevan, “Benevolent Deception in Human Computer Interaction”, CHI 2013

 

Interface Design based on the philosophy of Japanese Hospitality

Interface Design based on the philosophy of Japanese Hospitality

The Japanese culture is known for its excellent service and hospitality which is based onthe philosophy of Motenashi. This paper shows how aspects of Japanese hospitality can be applied to Interaction Design to enrich the sensual value of product interfaces. The analysis of Motenashi was undergone with literature on Japanese culture, guided interviews with Japanese and a documented visit of a traditional Japanese guest house. The three characteristic elements of the Japanese hospitality philosophy: 1. Shitsurai – the preparations for the guest, 2. Furumai – the behavior/attitude of host and guest and 3. Yosooi – the dressing code, are described in the paper. Examples on how to apply these to User Interface Design are given. E.g. Shitsurai, with its idea of a seasonally adjusted decoration, becomes a user interface that changes with season or daytime. Furumai reveals the importance of appropriate interactive behavior. This involves the flow of tasksand the voice/speech style as well as the evolution of the user’s relationship with his device. In the final part a conceptual approach for the design of Motenashi interfaces is outlined.

Read the full paper on Academia.edu.

Kerstin Bongard-Blanchy, “Interface Design based on the philosophy of Japanese Hospitality” in Proceedings of Design & Emotion, Chicago, Oct. 2010

Seen on FastCo.Design.

Digital Games as a Source of Enjoyment in Later Life

Digital Games as a Source of Enjoyment in Later Life

As playing digital games has become a popular pastime among older adults, the study of the older audience of digital games would do well to exchange exploratory research for more specialist and focused areas. This article follows this reasoning and focuses on game enjoyment in later life. This topic is explored through two qualitative studies with actively playing older adults. The first study (n = 35, aged between 49 and 73) took place in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium), while the second study (n = 40, aged between 44 and 77) was held in the U.S.A. (Virginia and Kentucky). Using the principles of Grounded Theory, three interpretations of game enjoyment in later life were identified, namely, telic, hedonic, and eudaimonic enjoyment. The article offers a number of design recommendations based on its findings and discusses how the interpretations are influenced by context and player gender, and are subject to change throughout the life span of an aging player.

Read the full paper.

Bob De Schutter, Julie A. Brown, “Digital Games as a Source of Enjoyment in Later Life” in Games and Culture, July 12 2015.

Bernard Roth, The Achievement Book

Bernard Roth, The Achievement Book

Bernard Roth (@bernie_roth) – academic director and one of the founders the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school) – has recently published The Achievement Book where he explains how to unlock the power of design thinking to help you achieving goals.

From the official description:

Back in the 1960s, mechanical engineer Bernard Roth met many engineers in the Silicon Valley, who worked for big companies such as Hewlett-Packard, and had dreams of starting their own companies. People just talked about it, and nothing happened. This observation inspired Roth to start teaching a class at Stanford in which each student had to choose a project having to do with their own life—writing a cookbook, building a robot, running a marathon—the only requirement was that the project was deeply personal. Now, for the first time, Roth brings his mantra of “Doing is Everything” to his inspirational and valuable new book, The Achievement Habit: Stop Wishing, Start Doing, and Take Command of Your Life.

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Coffeepot for Masochists: A Study in User-Centered System Design

Coffeepot for Masochists: A Study in User-Centered System Design

In this dissertation, Azad Ismail-Abas focus on evaluating different methods of creating a reliable user interface application to assist users of SeMiFOT.

The abstract

This master thesis is carried out in the field of “Human-Computer interaction”, more specifically the area “User-centered system design”. The focus has been on “usability” and useful graphical user interfaces. Current theories and definitions in the field have been considered. Literature studies contain well known authors and organisations in domains mentioned above; Jakob Nielsen, Donald A Norman and International Organization for Standardization ISO to mention some.

Another source for this work from which the theories and way of working have been used is the book “User-Centered System Design” written by Jan Gulliksen and Bengt Göransson. The work started with a literature study followed by looking at methods to use. The next step was to do task and user analysis which followed by the development phase. The user has been given a central role in this project and, just as recommended, also been involved through the whole cycle.

A useful method to get feedback from users, in addition to interviews and workshops, has been the “Heuristic Evaluation”. The final result and conclusion shows that the user-centered system design is a powerful tool to adapt when designing and developing interactive user interface.

Download the full dissertation.

HoloLens for Research: Academic Research Request for Proposals

HoloLens for Research: Academic Research Request for Proposals

 Microsoft has published a call for research proposal – HoloLens for Research – with the goal “to better understand the role and possible applications for holographic computing in society […] and encourage applications of holograms for novel purposes”. Deadline: September 5, 2015 (Midnight, Pacific Time).

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Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis

Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis

Cathie Marache-Francisco, Éric Brangier, “ Gamification and human-machine interaction: a synthesis ”, Le travail humain 2/2015 (Vol. 78) , p. 165-189. From the abstract:

Gamification deals with new human-machine interaction design practices. It consists of elements which are inspired from videogames, with the hope that this relationship which is designed to be more hedonic, engaging and motivating, will lead to positive changes within human-machine interactions, especially when applied to work practices and productivity matters. In this article, we present a synthesis of that notion, paralleled with ergonomics, concerning its definition and its design.

We first draw a definition from the gamification literature. It can be considered as the use of game elements in generally digital non-gaming systems which are adapted to the users’ profiles in order to generate motivation and engagement, with a focus on pleasurable experiences, even fun ones. We also mention the context of emergence of gamification. We then define and illustrate gamification design.

Afterwards, this paper highlights critical factors which could help the ergonomist to participate in the design of efficient and satisfactory gamified systems. We then broaden this discussion to analyze the core meaning of gamification at work: the promise of flourishing and engagement through innovative interactions, as well as the production of competitive knowledge.

Download the full paper (in French).